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Regarding My Son by Sonia Usatch-Kuhn
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She accompanies her son faithfully, no matter how distant he seems or how disheveled he becomes, hoping always 'to weave you whole again,' until at last he emerges with her into a new world of light and language and love. Regarding My Son is a journey in poetry about my son's diagnosis of schizophrenia through his recovery and college graduation in The poems deal with the issues of my observations of the hospital wards, the pain, hopelessness, stigma, hope, fear, wonder, frustration, doubt, and the process toward recovery as we took the path hand in hand.

Sonia Usatch-Kuhn, in facing the blank page, found release for the myriad feelings she experienced when her son Lance was diagnosed with schizophrenia thirty-five years ago. She is grateful to him for generously agreeing that these poems be shared. Soon he and a dream team of Silicon Valley technologists are charging into the fray, to raise consciousness about the existential threat of Facebook, and the persuasion architecture of the attention economy more broadly -- to our public health and to our political order. Zucked is both an enthralling personal narrative and a masterful explication of the forces that have conspired to place us all on the horns of this dilemma.

This is the story of a company and its leadership, but it's also a larger tale of a business sector unmoored from normal constraints, just at a moment of political and cultural crisis, the worst possible time to be given new tools for summoning the darker angels of our nature and whipping them into a frenzy. Like Jimmy Stewart in Rear Window, Roger McNamee happened to be in the right place to witness a crime, and it took him some time to make sense of what he was seeing and what we ought to do about it.

The result of that effort is a wise, hard-hitting, and urgently necessary account that crystallizes the issue definitively for the rest of us. Together they eat matzah, read from the Haggadah, and find the afikomen. However, when Gittel arrives at Ellis Island, she discovers the ink has run and the address is illegible! How will she find her family? Pippa the Mouse has been working hard all day-- cleaning her house, setting the table, cooking the meal. Everything looks great-- but her special Seder plate is missing! Searching through her tiny house turns up nothing, so Pippa ventures out to ask her neighbors if they can help.

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Bravely, she asks the other animals for help, but the snake, owl, and cat haven't seen her plate, either. But it's almost time for the Seder to begin, so she keeps looking-- and when she finds it, she invites all the other animals home to join her celebration. In bravely facing her animal neighbors, this adorable little mouse finds not only her missing Seder plate-- but new friends.

Filled with rhymes and repetition, this is a perfect title to share and read aloud, just in time for your own Passover festivities. A final spread with Pippa and her guests getting ready to hide the matzo and celebrate also shows the Passover plate with its six essential symbolic items: zeroah a roasted bone , beitzah, an egg , maror and charoset bitter herbs , chazeret mortar or paste , and karpas a spring vegetable. Gorf Gorfinkel, and illustrated in gorgeous color by Israeli artist Erez Zadok. The Passover Haggadah Graphic Novel integrates a brand-new, modern translation into sophisticated and super-fun sequential art that brings the epic story to life.

The result of extensive historical and linguistic research, every gorgeous panel imbues the classic narrative with renewed relevance and excitement. The graphic novel pages are presented alongside the unabridged, traditional Seder service text, in Hebrew and transliteration, and accompanied by how to instructional cartoons depicting all of the rituals, as celebrated every year for the last years in Jewish homes around the world.

This historic publication will appeal to family members and guests of multiple generations and diverse backgrounds. A universal or at least Earth based human medium for telling heroic stories, one that bridges all cultures, faiths and languages Featuring the full Hebrew text, together with an easy-to-read translation and transliteration, the Haggadah adds meaningful commentary, stories, questions for discussion, fun holiday parody songs, jokes, Seder recipes, and activities to delight both adults and children.

When you use this Haggadah, your guests will be so engaged that they will forget to ask When do we eat? Why the need for a new Haggadah? In some families, a Haggadah distributed by a leading coffee company might suffice. For others, further insight and explanation of the text is needed to make the Passover story come alive. This Haggadah has been designed to: Foster a deeper connection to Passover to enable participants from all backgrounds, from generation to generation, to be comfortable using a Hebrew or transliterated text, together with an inclusive English translation Provide a user-friendly format with suggestions for preparing for Passover and internalizing its messages afterwards Show the central role played by women in the Passover story Spark discussion and sharing of insights, teachings, anecdotes, and stories This Haggadah includes: Full Transliteration of the Hebrew Text Fun songs, recipes and stories will liven up your seder Kid s corner tidbits and points for everyone to share Color coding for the different features.

Each part can also be used as a stand-alone addition to a family or communal Seder. Before your Seder, spend some time reading through the entire document to familiarize yourself with which piece s might resonate most with your guests. Consider balancing discussion, readings, and ritual.

The Emoji Haggadah Paperback by Martin Bodek KTAV Emojis are the hieroglyphics of the 21st century, so have a blast deciphering the traditional Haggadah text written in a most untraditional format - entirely in emojis! Tips for decoding are included at the end of The Emoji Haggadah, along with the full traditional Hebrew and English Haggadah text.

Regarding My Son by Sonia Usatch-Kuhn

Enjoy your Passover acting out a "lost episode" where George forces Jerry to host Seder to impress an Israeli love interest. The clueless Elaine invites a wealthy Egyptian entrepreneur. From the Jewish parenting site Kveller. This haggadah is both rich and accessible, kid-friendly without overlooking the dramatic tensions at the center of the Passover story. It also features insights from renowned memory researchers, who help us understand how memory works and the connections between memory and food after all, the seder plate is full of "memory foods". For more information, visit www. Like his predecessors, Wood travelled through some of the harshest and most beautiful environments on earth, seeking to challenge our perceptions of this often-misunderstood part of the world.

At once a thrilling personal journey and a skillful piece of cultural reportage, Arabia is a breathtaking chronicle of an epic journey through the land at the root of all civilization. To bear a grudge is too negative, right? Wrong, says self-appointed grudge guru Sophie Hannah, in her groundbreaking and irreverent self-help guide.

Denying our negative emotions and experiences is likely to lead only to more pain, conflict, and stress. What if our grudges are good for us? What if we could embrace them, and use them to help ourselves and others, instead of feeling ashamed of our inability to banish negative emotions and memories from our lives? Grudges do not have to fill us with hate or make us toxic, bitter, and miserable.

It has evolved over several millennia through the influences of Arabic, Jewish, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Bedouin cultures and civilizations that have ruled over, or lived in, the area known as ancient Palestine. In each place she visits, Khan enters the kitchens of Palestinians of all ages and backgrounds, discovering the secrets of their cuisine and sharing heartlifting stories. The culinary traditions of Palestine?

Not so much. Willa's darkness enters Hesper's light late one night in Brooklyn. Theirs is a whirlwind romance until Willa starts to know Hesper too well, to crawl into her hidden spaces, and Hesper shuts her out. She runs, following her fractured family back to her grandfather's hometown of Tbilisi, Georgia, looking for the origin story that he is no longer able to tell.

But once in Tbilisi, cracks appear in her grandfather's history-and a massive flood is heading toward Georgia, threatening any hope for repair. Meanwhile, heartbroken Willa is so desperate to leave New York that she joins a group trip for Jewish twentysomethings to visit Holocaust sites in Germany and Poland, hoping to override her emotional state. When it proves to be more fraught than home, she must come to terms with her past-the ancestral past, her romantic past, and the past that can lead her forward.

Talese A routine procedure left novelist, memoirist, and poet Judy Goldman's husband paralyzed. Together is her unforgettable account of the struggle to regain their "normal" life and a nuanced portrait of a marriage tested. When Judy Goldman's husband of almost four decades reads a newspaper ad for an injection to alleviate back pain, the outpatient procedure sounds like the answer to his longtime backaches.

But rather than restoring his tennis game, the procedure leaves him paralyzed from the waist down--a phenomenon none of the doctors the family consults can explain. Overnight, Goldman's world is turned upside down. Though she has always thought of herself as the polite, demure wife opposite her strong, brave husband, Goldman finds herself thrown into a new role as his advocate, navigating byzantine hospital policies, demanding and refusing treatments, seeking solutions to help him win back his independence.

Along the way, Goldman flashes back to her memories of their life together. As she tries envision her family's future, she discovers a new, more resilient version of herself. Together is a story of the life we imagine versus the life we lead--an elegant and empathetic meditation on partnership, aging, and, of course, love. A family story, an immigrant story, a love story, and an epic meal, Savage Feast explores the challenges of navigating two cultures from an unusual angle.

He describes the unlikely dish that brought his parents together and how years of Holocaust hunger left his grandmother so obsessed with bread that she always kept five loaves on hand. The only problem was that their works were deeply antisemitic and entangled with claims that Jews were incapable of creating compassionate art. Kita shows how they reimagined myths of the Old Testament to offer new aesthetic and ethical views of compassion. These Jewish artists, including Gustav Mahler, Siegfried Lipiner, Richard Beer-Hofmann, Stefan Zweig, and Arnold Schoenberg, reimagined biblical stories through the lens of the modern Jewish subject to plead for justice and compassion toward the Jewish community.

By tracing responses to antisemitic discourses of compassion, Kita reflects on the explicitly and increasingly troubled political and social dynamics at the end of the Habsburg Empire. Yet ever since he shot to fame in the late s, the private Isaac Mizrahi has remained under wraps. Until now. In his elegant memoir, Isaac delves into his lifelong battles with weight, insomnia, and depression. He tells what it was like to be an out gay man in a homophobic age and to witness the ravaging effects of the AIDS epidemic.

Brimming with intimate details and inimitable wit, Isaac's narrative reveals not just the glamour of his years, but the grit beneath the glitz. Rich with memorable stories from in and out of the spotlight, I. Sholem Aleichem considered him as a forger of a new language that "breathed the European spirit into our old jargon. Through a study of his libretti, she looks at the experiences of Russian Jewish actors, male and female, to explore connections between culture as artistic production and culture in the sense of broader social structures.

Nearly every client Aaron Dignan meets, from Wall Street to Silicon Valley, points to the same frustrations: lack of trust, bottlenecks in decision making, siloed functions and teams, meeting and email overload, tiresome budgeting, short-term thinking, and more. Is there any hope for a solution? Haven't countless business gurus promised the answer, yet changed almost nothing about the way we work? That's because we fail to recognize that organizations aren't machines to be predicted and controlled.

They're complex human systems full of potential waiting to be released. Dignan says you can't fix a team, department, or organization by tinkering around the edges. Over the years, he has helped his clients completely reinvent their operating systems--the fundamental principles and practices that shape their culture--with extraordinary success. And they're not alone. Imagine a bank that abandoned traditional budgeting, only to outperform its competition for decades. An appliance manufacturer that divided itself into 2, autonomous teams, resulting not in chaos but rapid growth.

A healthcare provider with a headquarters of just 50 people supporting over 14, in the field--named "best place to work" year after year. Their stories may sound improbable, but in Brave New Work you'll learn exactly how they and other organizations are inventing a smarter, healthier, andmore effective way to work.

Not through top-down mandates, but through a groundswell of autonomy, trust, and transparency. Whether you lead a team of ten or ten thousand, improving your operating system is the single most powerful thing you can do. The only question is, are you ready? Mikhail Sholokhov is arguable one of the most contentious recipients of the Nobel Prize in Literature. Stalin's Scribe is remarkable biography that both reinforces and clashes with our understanding of the Soviet system. It reveals a Sholokhov who is bold, uncompromising, and sympathetic-and reconciles him with the vindictive and mean-spirited man described in so many accounts of late Soviet history.

They raised a new generation in Syria while waiting for the conflict to be resolved so they could return to their homeland. Instead, another fight overtook their asylum. Their only haven was in music and in each other. Forced to leave his family behind, Aeham sought out a safe place for them to call home and build a better life, taking solace in the indestructible bond between fathers and sons to keep moving forward. Avery Bloom, who's bookish, intense, and afraid of many things, particularly deep water, lives in New York City.

Bett Devlin, who's fearless, outgoing, and loves all animals as well as the ocean, lives in California. What they have in common is that they are both twelve years old, and are both being raised by single, gay dads. When their dads fall in love, Bett and Avery are sent, against their will, to the same sleepaway camp. Their dads hope that they will find common ground and become friends--and possibly, one day, even sisters.


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But things soon go off the rails for the girls and for their dads too , and they find themselves on a summer adventure that neither of them could have predicted. Now that they can't imagine life without each other, will the two girls who sometimes call themselves Night Owl and Dogfish figure out a way to be a family?

Companions in Conflict: Animals in Occupied Palestine by Penny Johnson February Melville Books An award-winning author explores the Israeli-Palestinian conflict through a surprising lens: the animals trying to survive in occupied hotspots In August of , Israeli police officers arrested a Palestinian donkey in the Jordan Valley.

The charge? Not having the correct paperwork. It's an image as sad and strangely common as it is symbolic: No creature great or small is free from the absurdities of the Occupied Territories. Companions in Conflict is a surprising investigation into the deeply intertwined lives of the region's human and animal populations: From camel beauty contests, to a heard of "illegal" Palestinain cows hunted down by Israeli soldiers; from a hyena in a wolf pack that becomes a symbol of Middle East peace, to the tragic story of the now-taxidermied inhabitants of the West Bank's only zoo--who were frightened to death by Israeli explosive devices.

Drawing on three decades of living in the region, Penny Johnson's Insightful writing reveals what these and many other animals' fates tell us about the current state of Israel and Palestine. What's more, looking forward, she introduces a new generation of environmental activists to us, who represent the region's best hope for conservation, collaboration, and justice for all creatures. Andy Sweet graduated from college and drove to his hometown of Miami Beach. He started to photograph the elderly Jews of Miami Beach and South Beach, in saturated vibrant colors, as they loved retirement, found joy, danced, partied, swam, prayed, loved, and sat on porches and benches.

It was a brief period of time that fast evaporated as poverty, crime, dilapidation, and death came to the area. Miami Beach and Miami descended into the Miami Vice period of cocaine and drugs and murders. The Paradise was Lost. Sweet was then murdered brutally in ; his photos, which the family stored at art warehouse were lost in a move. Decades later, some contact sheets were found and newer digital technologies allowed the pics to be recreated. After you get some distance from a place, you realize there were some things you liked after all.

Abdel Latif, an old man from the Aleppo region, dies peacefully in a hospital bed in Damascus. His final wish, conveyed to his youngest son, Bolbol, is to be buried in the family plot in their ancestral village of Anabiya. Though Abdel was hardly an ideal father, and though Bolbol is estranged from his siblings, this conscientious son persuades his older brother Hussein and his sister Fatima to accompany him and the body to Anabiya, which is-after all-only a two-hour drive from Damascus.

Syria, however, is no longer a place for heroes, and the decisions the family must make along the way-as they find themselves captured and recaptured, interrogated, imprisoned, and bombed-will prove to have enormous consequences for all of them. His fading musical aspirations, his tyrannical CEO, his ex-wives, his exiting girlfriend, his aging father, his beloved and troublesome children and his confused and bewildered life all bear witness to the sky that he is convinced will soon fall on his head.

And then it does. This is the story of a man adrift in anxiety, ill-fortune, and comic mishap, buffeted by the existential and prosaic concerns that modern life in Los Angeles inflicts. Forty years old, caught in the netherworld between the reckless optimism of youth and the resignation of age, Meyer tries to find handrails and ballast. Funny, intellectually probing, and poignant, the story follows the flailing and hapless Meyer seeking hope and redemption as his world unravels around him.

Surrounded by the absurdity of a waning America, the affection of flawed but well-meaning friends and family, and the randomness of everyday life, Meyer tries gamely to stay afloat. He must navigate love lost and found and lost, the indignities of aging, the courage to stand up to assholes and the search for the perfect sax solo.

Will Meyer find his grace? Can he, or we, ever? Nations and peoples on all continents looked to America to stand up for the values that created the Western world, and to oppose autocracy and repression. Even when America did not live up to its ideals, it still recognized their importance, at home and abroad. The Empire and the Five Kings is a cri de coeur that draws upon lessons from history and the eternal touchstones of human culture to reveal the stakes facing the West as America retreats from its leadership role, a process that did not begin with Donald Trump's presidency and is not likely to end with him.

The crisis is one whose roots can be found as far back as antiquity and whose resolution will require the West to find a new way forward if its principles and values are to survive. By their daughter, an acclaimed writer and producer. King Kong elevated Fay Wray to the tip of the Empire State Building and the heights of cinematic immortality; she starred in more than one hundred and twenty pictures, and was directed by such masters as William Wellman, Erich von Stroheim, and Vincente Minnelli.

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Robert Riskin, Wray's husband, was one of Hollywood's seminal screenwriters, originator of the "screwball comedy" and the true populist voice of the "little guy" that gave Frank Capra's movies the "Capra touch"; Riskin's sophisticated stage plays and screen comedies of Hollywood's classic era became famous for their blend of humor and romance, wisecracking and idealism. Their daughter, Victoria Riskin, a former president of the Writers Guild of America West, tells the story of their lives, their work, their Hollywood, their fairy-tale marriage that ended so tragically. On the one hand, controversy arises when Old Testament laws seem either odd beyond comprehension not eating pork or positively reprehensible executing children.

On the other, neglect results when we consider the law obsolete, no long carrying any normative power tassels on clothing, making sacrifices. Even readers who do attempt to make use of the Old Testament "law" often find it either irrelevant, hopelessly laden with "thou shalt nots," or simply so confusing that they throw up their hands in despair.

Despite these extremes, people continue to propose moral principles from these laws as "the biblical view" and to garner proof texts to resolve issues that arise in society. The result is that both Christians and skeptics regularly abuse the Torah, and its true message often lies unheard.

Walton and Walton offer in The Lost World of the Torah a restorative vision of the ancient genre of instruction for wisdom that makes up a significant portion of the Old Testament. In the ancient Near East, order was achieved through the wisdom of those who governed society. Here readers will find fresh insight on this fundamental genre of the Old Testament canon. Known for her aptitude, beauty, and deadliness, Stein is asked to set up a secret unit that will act independently, answerable only to the Prime Minister.

This streamlined and deadly unit, filled with bright young men and women recruited and trained by Stein, quickly faces threats both old and new. Descendants of the lethal militant Red Army Faction have returned to terrorize Europe and fears of a radical Islam splinter group force the unit to distinguish between facts and smoke screens. Merchants of Truth is the groundbreaking and gripping story of the precarious state of the news business told by one of our most eminent journalists.

The new digital reality nearly kills two venerable newspapers with an aging readership while creating two media behemoths with a ballooning and fickle audience of millennials. We get to know the defenders of the legacy presses as well as the outsized characters who are creating the new speed-driven media competitors. Merchants of Truth raises crucial questions that concern the well-being of our society. We are facing a crisis in trust that threatens the free press. Mark Bittman is revered for his simple, straightforward, and flexible approach to everyday cooking.

In Dinner for Everyone, he shares essential main dishes, each with easy, vegan, and all-out recipes as the mood or occasion requires. These all-new recipes, accompanied by more than full-color photographs, form a diverse collection that includes quick meals for busy weeknights hearty soups, tacos, and one-pot pastas , creative plant-based fare that will please both vegans and non-vegans alike lemon polenta with mushroom ragu, pomegranate-glazed eggplant, or cauliflower tinga tacos , and impressive dishes perfect for entertaining handmade noodles and even your Thanksgiving centerpiece.

Whatever the experience level, craving, or time constraint, home cooks will find exactly what they need to prepare all their favorites with confidence and enthusiasm. Rooted in Mark's philosophy of using efficient cooking techniques, fresh ingredients, and basic equipment--and written in his signature to-the-point style--Dinner for Everyone is a one-stop, indispensable reference for life's ultimate question: What's for dinner?

Johnson Univ of South Florida February 26, Columbia University Press Johnson, a consultant to the Jewish Women's Archive, and a recent speaker on the Lavender Scare of the s at the Jewish Museum of Milwaukee has written a book on how post-war physique magazines fueled a movement. In , a new type of publication appeared on newsstands-the physique magazine produced by and for body builders, but actually gay men. For many men growing up in the s and s, these magazines and their images and illustrations of nearly naked men, as well as articles, letters from readers, and advertisements, served as an initiation into gay culture.

Such businesses have often been seen as peripheral to the gay political movement. In this book, David K. Johnson shows how gay commerce was not a byproduct but rather an important catalyst for the gay rights movement. Offering a vivid look into the lives of physique entrepreneurs and their customers, and presenting a wealth of illustrations, Buying Gay explores the connections-and tensions-between the market and the movement. This network of producers and consumers helped foster a gay community and upend censorship laws, paving the way for open expression.

Physique entrepreneurs were at the center of legal struggles, especially against the U. Post Office, including the court victory that allowed full-frontal male nudity and open homoeroticism. Buying Gay reconceives the history of the gay rights movement and shows how consumer culture helped create community and a site for resistance. Frisch knows school buses and ice cream. Ian brings us with him as he not only gets to know this fascinating world, but also becomes an integral part of it. We join them at private gatherings of the most extraordinary magicians working today, follow them to magic conventions in Las Vegas and England, and discover some of the best tricks of the trade.

As he tells the story of the52, and his role as its most unlikely member, Ian reveals his own connection with trickery and deceit and how he first learned the elements that make magic work from his poker-playing mother. Written with psychological acuity and a keen eye for detail, Magic Is Dead is an engrossing tale full of wonder and surprise. Daphne Maritch doesn't quite know what to make of the heavily annotated high school yearbook she inherits from her mother, who held this relic dear.

Too dear. In a fit of decluttering the yearbook did not, Daphne concluded, "spark joy" , she discards it when she moves to a small New York City apartment. Good Riddance is a pitch-perfect, whip-smart new novel from an "enchanting, infinitely witty yet serious, exceptionally intelligent, wholly original, and Austen-like stylist" Washington Post.

Jacob Dinezon is truly a giant in Yiddish literature. But the couple's bright horizon is clouded by the ruthless actions of Roza's brother-in-law, the Dark Young Man, who plots to protect his power in the family by destroying the young lovers. The startling outcome made The Dark Young Man a runaway bestseller when it was first published in In the Closet of the Vatican is a book that reveals these secrets and penetrates this enigma.

It derives from a system founded on a clerical culture of secrecy which starts in junior seminaries and continues right up to the Vatican itself. It is based on the double lives of priests and on extreme homophobia. The resulting schizophrenia in the Church is hard to fathom. But the more a prelate is homophobic, the more likely it is that he is himself gay. No one can claim to really understand the Catholic Church today until they have read this book. It reveals a truth that is extraordinary and disturbing. Cohen demonstrates that Jews constructed a robust religious musical conversation in the United States during the mid- to lateth century.

Far from seeing a fallow musical landscape, Cohen finds that Central European Jews in the United States spearheaded a major revision of the sounds and traditions of synagogue music during this period of rapid liturgical change. Focusing on the influences of both individuals and texts, Cohen demonstrates how American Jewish musicians sought to balance artistry and group singing, rather than "progressing" from solo chant to choir and organ. Congregations shifted between musical genres and practices during this period in response to such factors as finances, personnel, and communal cohesiveness.

Cohen concludes that the "soundtrack" of 19th-century Jewish American music heavily shapes how we look at Jewish American music and life in the first part of the 21st-century, arguing that how we see, and especially hear, history plays a key role in our understanding of the contemporary world around us. He was one of the founders of the Kiev Kultur-Lige and his work was at the center of the Yiddish-speaking world of the time.

He was well known for creating characters who often felt the painful after-effects of the past and the clumsiness of bodies stumbling through the actions of daily life as their familiar worlds crumbled around them. Murav grapples with the great modern theorists of time and memory, especially Henri Bergson, Sigmund Freud, and Walter Benjamin, to present Bergelson as an integral part of the philosophical and artistic experiments, political and technological changes, and cultural context of Russian and Yiddish modernism that marked his age.

As a comparative and interdisciplinary study of Yiddish literature and Jewish culture, this work adds a new, ethnic dimension to understandings of the turbulent birth of modernism. Larry is an atheist, an apostate from his Brooklyn-born Orthodox Jewish family. His father passes away and he flies from his Brooklyn non-Jewish neighborhood to the Orthodox enclave in Memphis.

e-book The Book of Asher : Memoirs of a Passionate Jewish Life

And so, in Chapter 1, Larry is stuck in a house, feeling that all the mourners who visit are judging him, staring at him but they are. His claustrophobic feelings are amplified by his sleeping in the skinny, small bed of his nephew. As the only son in a conservative Orthodox family, it is Larry's responsibility to recite the Kaddish prayer for his father, each day for eleven months.

Larry is quite self-absorbed. To appease his family, and in penance for failing to mourn his father correctly, he hatches a plan. He will hire a stranger through a website called kaddish. But then, inspired by the young man Chemi that he hired, Larry returns to Orthodoxy, marries, and starts a family. But what is up with this obsession with the man he hired to say kaddish? Larry, now named Shuli, living in Brooklyn as a teach He flies to Israel to find Chemi This is Nathan Englander's freshest and funniest work to date--a satire that touches, lightly and with unforgettable humor, on the conflict between religious and secular worlds, and the hypocrisies that run through both.

A novel about atonement; about spiritual redemption; and about the soul-sickening temptations of the internet, which, like God, is everywhere. Across four generations, Jay Howard Geller illuminates the transformation of traditional Jews into modern German citizens, the challenges they faced, and the ways that they shaped the German-Jewish century, beginning with Prussia's emancipation of the Jews in and ending with exclusion and disenfranchisement under the Nazis.

Focusing on the renowned philosopher and Kabbalah scholar Gershom Scholem and his family, their story beautifully draws out the rise and fall of bourgeois life in the unique subculture that was Jewish Berlin. Geller portrays the family within a much larger context of economic advancement, the adoption of German culture and debates on Jewish identity, struggles for integration into society, and varying political choices during the German Empire, World War I, the Weimar Republic, and the Nazi era.

What Geller discovers, and unveils for the reader, is a fascinating portal through which to view the experience of the Jewish middle class in Germany. This new book from celebrated biographer Phyllis Rose reconsiders Stieglitz as a revolutionary force in the history of American art. Born in New Jersey, Stieglitz later studied in Germany, where his father, a wool merchant and painter, insisted he would get a proper education.

After returning to America, he became one of the first American photographers to achieve international fame. By the time he was sixty, he gave up photography and devoted himself to selling and promoting art. His first gallery, , was the first American gallery to show works by Picasso, Rodin, Matisse, and other great European modernists. His galleries were not dealerships so much as open universities, where he introduced European modern art to Americans and nurtured an appreciation of American art among American artists. The four spies at the center of this story were part of a ragtag unit known as the Arab Section, conceived during World War II by British spies and Jewish militia leaders in Palestine.

Intended to gather intelligence and carry out sabotage and assassinations, the unit consisted of Jews who were native to the Arab world and could thus easily assume Arab identities. Israel sees itself and presents itself as a Western nation, when in fact more than half the country has Middle Eastern roots and traditions, like the spies of this story. And, according to Friedman, that goes a long way toward explaining the life and politics of the country, and why it often baffles the West. For anyone interested in real-life spies and the paradoxes of the Middle East, Spies of No Country is an intimate story with global significance.

We've raised families and had careers. We've been around the world, figuratively if not literally. We've done a lot. And we're getting older. So we might as well get good at it. Getting Good at Getting Older: A Jewish Catalog for a New Age is a tour for all of us "of a certain age" through the resources and skills we need to navigate the years between maturity and old age.

Getting Good at Getting Older brings humor, warmth, and 4, years of Jewish experience to the question of how to shape this new stage of life. The entire list is up for debate, which is what makes this book so much fun. Many of the foods are delicious such as babka and shakshuka. As expected, many Jewish and now universal favorites like matzo balls, pickles, cheesecake, blintzes, and chopped liver make the list. The recipes are global and represent all contingencies of the Jewish experience.

You might be surprised to learn the Jewish histories of Sweet n Low and Bazooka bubble gum. Presented in a gifty package, The Most Jewish Foods is the perfect book to dip into, quote from, cook from, and launch a spirited debate. For these reasons, the Bible can be brought to life in English only by re-creating its literary virtuosity, and Alter discusses the principal aspects of style in the Hebrew Bible that any translator should try to reproduce: word choice, syntax, word play and sound play, rhythm, and dialogue.

In the process, he provides an illuminating and accessible introduction to biblical style that also offers insights about the art of translation far beyond the Bible. Love brought them together. Bookshop owner Max Beissinger meets Hanna Ginsberg, a budding concert violinist, and immediately he feels a powerful chemistry between them.

As their love affair unfolds over the next five years, the climate drastically changes in Germany as Hitler comes to power. Their love is tested with the new landscape and the realities of war, not the least of which is that Hanna is Jewish and Max is not. In , Hanna Ginsberg awakens in a field outside of Berlin. Disoriented and afraid, she has no memory of the past ten years and no idea what has happened to Max.

Even without an orchestra to play in, she throws herself completely into her music to keep alive her lifelong dream of becoming a concert violinist. But the music also serves as a balm to heal her deeply wounded heart and she eventually gets the opening she long hoped for. Even so, as the days, months, and years pass, taking her from London to Paris to Vienna to America, she continues to be haunted by her forgotten past, and the fate of the only man she has ever loved and cannot forget.

What does it mean to be a Jewish woman in America? In a gripping historical narrative, Pamela S. Nadell weaves together the stories of a diverse group of extraordinary people-from the colonial-era matriarch Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter, poet Emma Lazarus, to labor organizer Bessie Hillman and the great justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, to scores of other activists, workers, wives, and mothers who helped carve out a Jewish American identity.

The twin threads binding these women together, she argues, are a strong sense of self and a resolute commitment to making the world a better place. Nadell recounts how Jewish women have been at the forefront of causes for centuries, fighting for suffrage, trade unions, civil rights, and feminism, and hoisting banners for Jewish rights around the world. Ethiopia stands as a land apart: never colonized, it celebrates ancient traditions. The fascinatingly distinct cuisine is influenced by a history enriched with a religious mix of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as some of the most fertile land on the continent.

The delicious dishes featured here include Doro Wat, chicken stewed with berbere spice, Siga Tibs, flashfried beef, and Asa Shorba, a hearty spiced fish soup, plus vegetarian dishes such as Gomen, collard greens with ginger and garlic, Azifa, green lentil salad, and Dinich Alicha, potatoes and carrots in an onion turmeric sauce. Along with photography of the stunning landscapes and vibrant artisans of Ethiopia combined with insightful cultural and historical details this book demonstrates why Ethiopian food should be considered one of the world s most singular and enchanting cuisines.

I just like the surname of this Loudoun County guy who started a firm in his Virginia dorm room and got funding for projects from a Virginia billionaire. I don't consider myself exceptionally brilliant. I just realized something few people know: You don't need lots of money or an original idea to get really rich. This book will show you how I went from college dropout to member of the New Rich. And I'm holding nothing back.

You'll see my tax returns, my profit and loss statements, my email negotiations when buying and selling companies. It's time to forget your grandfather's advice. I'll teach you how to be a modern opportunist--investor, entrepreneur, or side hustler--by breaking these four golden rules of the old guard: 1. Focus on one skill: Wrong. Don't cultivate one great skill to get ahead. In today's business world, success goes to the multitaskers.

Be unique: Wrong. The way to get rich is not by launching a new idea but by aggressively copying others and then adding your own twist. Focus on one goal: Wrong. Focus instead on creating a system to produce the outcome you want, not just once, but over and over again. Appeal to the masses: Wrong. Let others cut a trail through the jungle so you can peacefully walk in and capitalize on their hard work.

By rejecting these defunct rules and following my unconventional path, you can copy other people's ideas shamelessly, bootstrap a start-up with almost no funding, invest in small local businesses for huge payoffs, and reap all the benefits.

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How We Fight White Supremacy: A Field Guide to Black Resistance by Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin March 26, NationBooks This celebration of Black resistance, from protests to art to sermons to joy, offers a blueprint for the fight for freedom and justice-and ideas for how each of us can contribute Many of us are facing unprecedented attacks on our democracy, our privacy, and our hard-won civil rights. If you're Black in the US, this is not new. As Colorlines editors Akiba Solomon and Kenrya Rankin show, Black Americans subvert and resist life-threatening forces as a matter of course.

In these pages, leading organizers, artists, journalists, comedians, and filmmakers offer wisdom on how they fight White supremacy. It's a must-read for anyone new to resistance work, and for the next generation of leaders building a better future. Grab some popcorn and take a seat The curtain is about to rise on a film like no other! Rejected by MGM, the script was thought lost forever. In the story, a businessman named Jimmy played by Harpo is drawn to the mysterious Surrealist Woman, whose very presence changes humdrum reality into Dali-esque fantasy.

Includes new Marx Brothers songs and antics, plus the real-world story behind the historic collaboration. Where I come from, we keep these stories to ourselves. Seventeen-year-old Isra prefers reading books to entertaining the suitors her father has chosen for her. Brooklyn, But her grandmother is firm on the matter: the only way to secure a worthy future for Deya is through marriage to the right man. Set in an America at once foreign to many and staggeringly close at hand, A Woman Is No Man is a story of culture and honor, secrets and betrayals, love and violence.

It is an intimate glimpse into a controlling and closed cultural world, and a universal tale about family and the ways silence and shame can destroy those we have sworn to protect. Nadell American University March Norton A groundbreaking history of how Jewish women have maintained their identity and influenced social activism as they wrote themselves into American history. A middling professor at a Midwestern college, he can't afford his mortgage, he's exasperated his much-younger girlfriend, and his kids won't speak to him. And then there's the money--the small fortune his late wife Francine kept secret, which she bequeathed directly to his children.

Those children are Ethan, an anxious recluse living off his mother's money on a choice plot of Brooklyn real estate; and Maggie, a would-be do-gooder trying to fashion herself a noble life of self-imposed poverty. On the verge of losing the family home, Arthur invites his children back to St.

Dirty Family Secrets: Frank McCourt & Martin Amis on Writing Memoirs - Angela's Ashes (2001)

Louis under the guise of a reconciliation. But in doing so, he unwittingly unleashes a Pandora's box of age-old resentments and long-buried memories--memories that orbit Francine, the matriarch whose life may hold the key to keeping them together. Louis, and a small desert outpost in Zimbabwe, The Altruists is a darkly funny and ultimately tender family saga in the tradition of Jonathan Franzen and Jeffrey Eugenides, with shades of Philip Roth and Zadie Smith.

It's a novel about money, privilege, politics, campus culture, dating, talk therapy, rural sanitation, infidelity, kink, the American beer industry, and what it means to be a "good person. His actions were not accepted by his family, but a wise pharaoh knew how to draw out, extract and apply his interpretations. Viewed through this lens, Yosef emerges as a more familiar and less enigmatic individual, exhibiting both strengths and weaknesses commonly associated with autism spectrum disorder. Sure, the author is not a psychologist, but his insights can be used by you to view Jospeh differently and aid in new interpretations of the story.

No other book, movie, or exhibition has ever told this sweeping story. Not only has Brooklyn always lived in the shadow of queer Manhattan neighborhoods like Greenwich Village and Harlem, but there has also been a systematic erasure of its queer history-a great forgetting. Ryan is here to unearth that history for the first time. In intimate, evocative, moving prose he discusses in new light the fundamental questions of what history is, who tells it, and how we can only make sense of ourselves through its retelling; and shows how the formation of the Brooklyn we know today is inextricably linked to the stories of the incredible people who created its diverse neighborhoods and cultures.

Palestinian "stone men", utilizing some of the best quality dolomitic limestone deposits in the world and drawing on generations of artisanal knowledge, have built almost every state in the Middle East except their own.


  • TABLE OF CONTENTS.
  • Rim Haven.
  • Timeline of Imam Ali.

Today the business of quarrying, cutting, fabrication, and dressing is Palestine's largest employer and generator of revenue, supplying the construction industry in Israel, along with other Middle East countries and even more overseas. Ross asks how the record of achievement and labor can be recognized. At the heart of this ongoing Cold War between Riyadh and Tehran lie the Sunni-Shia divide, and the two countries' intertwined histories.

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Saudis see this as a conflict between Sunni and Shia; Iran's ruling clerics view it as one between their own Islamic Republic and an illegitimate monarchy. This foundational schism has played out in a geopolitical competition for dominance in the region: Iran has expanded its influence in Syria, Iraq and Lebanon, while Saudi Arabia's hyperactive crown prince, Muhammad bin Salman, has intervened in Yemen, isolated Qatar and destabilized Lebanon.

Dilip Hiro examines the toxic rivalry between the two countries, tracing its roots and asking whether this Islamic Cold War is likely to end any time soon. They engaged in lengthy discussions about his foundational views drawn from his experience and unique vantage point in the two world bodies. The Book of David is based on his personal notes, extensive archival records and reflections from these conversations.

In Horowitz's autobiography Thirty-three Candles published in , he wrote: "Thirty-three Candles undoubtedly calls for a sequel because much has occurred on the world scene since , most of it confirming its major thesis. I feel I shall have to bow to this demand. This book documents the life and legacy of David Horowitz and stands as a permanent accounting of the unfolding events in his life and his role in the affairs of the United Nations, the State of Israel, and United Israel World Union during the latter half of the twentieth century.

By its very nature, the ideals of religion entail sin and failure. Judaism has its own language and framework for sin that expresses themselves both legally and philosophically. Both legal questions-circumstances where sin is permissible or mandated, the role of intention and action-as well as philosophical questions-why sin occurs and how does Judaism react to religious crisis-are considered within this volume.

This book will present the concepts of sin and failure in Jewish thought, weaving together biblical and rabbinic studies to reveal a holistic portrait of the notion of sin and failure within Jewish thought. The suffix "agogue" means to lead or grow. But behind all the glamour is the little-known tale of OPI's unlikely origins-an intimate and inspiring story of a timid schoolgirl who arrives in this country with little money and no English and becomes the business leader and industry game-changer known worldwide as "Suzi, the First Lady of Nails.

She shares how those early experiences gave rise to OPI's revolutionary vision of freedom and empowerment, and how Suzi transformed an industry by celebrating the power of color-and of women themselves. There is no middle ground. And one of the great terrors of being a leader is knowing your real world can be just as brutal-and offices bring no comfort. Every day you're presented with opportunities and challenges, and must decide which roads to follow, which risks to confront, when to deny an opportunity and when to pursue the call to adventure.

And you won't know whether you'll profit or fail while you're in the thick of it. In Win or Die: Leadership Secrets from Game of Thrones, Bruce Craven brilliantly analyzes the journeys of the best and worst leaders in Westeros, so that leaders can create their own narratives of success. Craven considers beloved characters such as Ned Stark, Jon Snow, Daenerys Targaryen, and Tyrion Lannister as they make terrible decisions and fatal mistakes, but also achieve incredible victories and surprising successes, learning and growing along their often bloody ways.

Readers will learn how to face conflict and build resilience, develop contextual and emotional intelligence, develop their vision, and more. This entertaining and accessible guide will show readers how to turn danger into opportunity, even when dragons threaten. From the star of Broadway's The Book of Mormon and HBO's Girls, comes the heartfelt and hilarious memoir of a Midwestern guy surviving bad auditions, bad relationships, and some really bad highlights as he chases his dreams in New York City.

To start over. To transform the fiercely ambitious but sexually confused teenager he saw in the mirror into the Broadway leading man of his dreams. In Too Much Is Not Enough, Rannells takes us on the journey of a twentysomething hungry to experience everything: new friends, wild nights, great art, standing ovations. And at the heart of his hunger lies a powerful drive to reconcile the boy he was and the man he might have been with the man he wants to be. As Rannells reveals how he merged these Andrews into the one who made his Broadway debut at 26, he also shares stories from his path to the Great White Way, from horrible auditions and behind-the-curtain romances to the exhilaration of landing his first gig in Hairspray and the heartbreaking death of his father at the height of his ascent.

Along the way, Rannells learns that you never really leave your past--or your family--behind; that the most painful, and perversely motivating, jobs are the ones you almost get; and that sometimes the most unforgettable nights are marked not by the hot clubs you danced at, but by the recap over diner food after. But before this actor, writer, director, comedian, and composer entertained the world, his first audience was his family. Growing up in a household too poor to own a radio, Mel was short and homely, a mischievous child whose birth role was to make the family laugh.

Beyond boyhood, after transforming himself into Mel Brooks, the laughs that came easily inside the Kaminsky family proved more elusive. I jest But seriously, how many book by religious publishers are authored by women? Exploring the various manifestations of female leadership, whether as women rabbis or other forms of female halachic adjudication, Welcoming Women Clergy responds to the standard criticisms leveled at the recent phenomenon of female authority within the Orthodox community.

In this ground-breaking book, Rabbi Professor Daniel Sperber argues the halachic, political, and sociological levels of female leadership in Judaism. In Salt Smoke Time, he explores ideas of self-reliance, sustainability, and seasonality, illuminating our connection to the natural world and the importance of preserving American stories and food traditions. He provides an in-depth understanding of milk products, fishing, trapping seafood, hunting, butchering meat, cooking whole animals, foraging, and harvesting, and even offers tips on wild medicine.

Horowitz takes traditional foods that have been enjoyed for generations and turns them into fresh new non kosher dishes. Complete with step-by-step line drawings inspired by vintage Boy Scout and Field Guides and illustrated with beautiful rustic photos, Salt Smoke Time is both a nostalgic study of our roots, and a handy guide for rediscovering self-reliance and independence in our contemporary lives.

The Lions' Den: Zionism and the Left from Hannah Arendt to Noam Chomsky by Susie Linfield March Yale University Press A lively intellectual history that explores how prominent midcentury public intellectuals approached Zionism and then the State of Israel itself and its conflicts with the Arab world In this lively intellectual history of the political Left, cultural critic Susie Linfield investigates how eight prominent twentieth-century intellectuals struggled with the philosophy of Zionism, and then with Israel and its conflicts with the Arab world.